The HPV Vaccine can help prevent cancer

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The CDC has helpful information on the HPV virus and vaccine. The vaccine is recommended for 11 to 12 year old children, both boys and girls. Help your child prevent cancer.

Listen to the KLCY Eagle Country interview with our Vaccine Coordinator, regarding the HPV vaccine. The radio spot aired on Give’m Health on Aug. 14, 2018.

Below is some very important information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Why does my child need HPV vaccine?

HPV vaccine is important because it protects against cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is a very common virus; nearly 80 million people—about one in four—are currently infected in the United States. About 14 million people, including teens, become infected with HPV each year.

Most people with HPV never develop symptoms or health problems. Most HPV infections (9 out of 10) go away by themselves within two years. But, sometimes, HPV infections will last longer, and can cause certain cancers and other diseases. HPV infection can cause:

  • cancers of the cervix, vagina, and vulva in women;
  • cancers of the penis in men; and
  • cancers of the anus and back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and tonsils (oropharynx), in both women and men.

Every year in the United States, HPV causes 32,500 cancers in men and women. HPV vaccination can prevent most of the cancers (about 30,000) from ever developing.

When should my child be vaccinated?

In this video, a family physician explains his decision, as a doctor and a parent, to make sure each of his children received HPV vaccine at age 11 or 12. HPV vaccine is cancer prevention. Ask about it for your child.

All kids who are 11 or 12 years old should get two shots of HPV vaccine six to twelve months apart. Adolescents who receive their two shots less than five months apart will require a third dose of HPV vaccine.

If your teen hasn’t gotten the vaccine yet, talk to their doctor or nurse about getting it for them as soon as possible. If your child is older than 14 years, three shots will need to be given over 6 months. Also, three doses are still recommended for people with certain immunocompromising conditions aged 9 through 26 years.

More information can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/vaccine.html

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